The eternal book - an idea goes around the world

 

The idea of the eternal book

It is often the little ideas which truly revolutionise life, be they the famous matches or the invention of the light bulb. Ring binder mechanisms are exactly the same – everyone knows what they are, everyone uses them. The inventor, Koloman Handler, was as creative as he was persistent and established his first small workshop in an outlying district of Vienna in 1900.

 

 

 

 

 

An idea goes around the world

At the beginning of the 20th century, most company accounting records were still firmly bound and sub­jected to severe wear through daily use, the thickness and the weight, especially at the edges. Handler recog­nised this gap in the market and began to produce rein­forcements, the so-called book corners, for those worn-out parts of the books. These corners, produced with a hand-operated screw press, caused such a furore in book binding circles that Koloman Handler quickly specialised in producing them in all shapes and sizes. He began to pursue the idea of making books more “sustainable” and then had the inspiration of binding books in rings which could open and close. And thus, the “eternal book” was created. The idea was very successful – in 1922, Handler con­structed his first factory in Vienna and secured the rights to a series of patents for ring binder systems. Everything from paperbacks to office records was available in ring binder form as early as the 1930s.